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AMUSE

Fall 2017

Date:September 20, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:2nd Floor Patio 
Speaker:Undergraduate Students, Texas A&M University, Department of Mathematics
Title:Mathematics Undergraduate Research Expo

Date:September 27, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Negar Kalantar, Texas A&M University, Department of Architecture
Title:Things that Transform
Abstract:Physical transformation is all around us. However designers and engineers mainly focus on the object as an essentially static thing. How can the designer understand transformation itself as a parameter that can be shaped, and crafted? Transformation and motion have a strong bond with geometry because at its core, motion is the spatial transformation of one geometric configuration into another. In any transformation design process, there are two design efforts: the generation of an underlying geometry and the creation of an overlaid pattern. Therefore, knowing geometry is the key to transformable design. In another word, Transformation is where art, architecture, science and math merge. Dr. Kalantar with 17 years of experience in designing transformable structures will speak about her work in the field of Transformable Design ranging from a handheld toy to large structures. Also she will share: the geometric principles to create objects that change their size, shape, and surface; the principles of transformable design, such as underlying geometries and overlaid patterns; design principles of transformable polygons with scissor linkages.

Date:October 4, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Peter Howard, Texas A&M University, Department of Mathematcis
Title:The Mathematics of Games of Chance
Abstract:Following early work by the Italian mathematician, physician, astrologer, and all around sketchy character Gerolamo Cardano, the classical theory of probability was developed in large part as an uneasy collaboration between professional gamblers such as Antoine Gombaud, and a coterie of brilliant French noblemen looking for just about any excuse to prove how smart they were (I'm looking at you, Pierre-Simon, Marquis de Laplace). In this talk, I'll give an overview of the early development of probability theory, and talk about applications to games of chance such as Roulette and Blackjack. Texas Hold'em will be mentioned as an invitation to study game theory.

Date:October 11, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Alireza Talebpour, Texas A&M University, Department of Civil Engineering
Title:Autonomous Vehicles: Challenges and Opportunities
Abstract:Driverless cars will appear on our roads and there is no question about that. The only question is "when?". To answer this question, we need to find a solution to several issues associated with this technology, including public acceptance and safety concerns. In this presentation, we will discuss the possible impacts of driverless cars on our lives, while a special focus will be made on the safety concerns.

Date:October 18, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Prabir Daripa, Texas A&M University, Department of Mathematics
Title:Mathematics of "Stability Theory" and "Chaos Theory"
Abstract:"When the present determines the future but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future", we will call it Chaos and study of this phenomena goes by the name "Chaos Theory" (In Wikipedia, you find this as one of the definitions of "Chaos" within "Chaos Theory"). "When the present determines the future and the approximate present does determine the future but may be a drastically different one", then what do we call the theory of this. For now let us call it: "Stability Theory". As you notice just from these definitions, there is a subtle but drastic difference between these two theories. In one case you treat the future (or outcome) as a random variable where as in the later case, you treat it as a deterministic variable. The goal of this seminar is to demystify and exemplify this difference using simple maps, linear algebra and many events, some extreme ones such hurricane Harvey, around us. The content of the talk will be kept very simple so that it is accessible to even first year undergraduate students.

Date:October 25, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Darren Hartl, Texas A&M University, Department of Aerospace Engineering
Title:Advantageous couplings: the science and math behind multifunctional materials and structures
Abstract:The development of active and adaptive aerospace structures based on the behavior of unique materials has been considered with great fervor especially since the various federally funded efforts of the 1990's. What is new and highly enabling is the increased fidelity of three-dimensional mathematical models and especially the implementation of these models into ever more comprehensive design frameworks. Given the sustained improvement of such design tools, full analysis-driven optimization considering such concepts as coupled fields and uncertainty may soon become common practice in the multifunctional structure design community. This will enable both the increased performance of current concepts and an expansion in creativity regarding the kinds of material and structural configurations considered. This talk will review recent multifunctional material and structures modeling and design efforts with which Dr. Hartl has been involved over the last three years as well as his current research efforts at Texas A&M. Some of the advances in multifunctional aerospace structural modeling and design will be highlighted. Design concepts such as liquid metal-based reconfigurable antennas and morphing components will be described, and design approaches leveraging evolutionary genetic programming will be shared.”

Date:November 1, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Maurice Rojas, Department of Mathematics, Texas A&M University
Title:Geometry, Sorting, and Optimizing
Abstract:We start with a geometric explanation of why sorting n numbers always takes at least n log n comparisons, up to small constant factor. We'll then see a nice algorithm by Snoeyink for how to find the rectangle with largest area (and axis parallel sides) inside of a polygon. We'll also explain why the last problem is relevant to architectural design.

Date:November 8, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Kamran Entesari, Texas A&M University, Department of Electrical and Computer
Title:Mathematical Analysis of Signal and Noise In Digital Wireless Communication Channels
Abstract:This talk describes the mathematical representation of fundamental concepts behind signal transmission and reception in digital wireless communication channels including frequency domain and modulation theory. It also explains the concept of stochastic process and channel noise to calculate signal to noise ratio and bit-error rate in digital receivers. The talk is concluded with an example of a real-world digital wireless communication system.

Date:November 15, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Amin Zeiaee, PhD Student, Texas A&M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering
Title:Design and Control of a Novel Rehabilitation Exoskeleton
Abstract:Mathematical techniques are widely used in design and control of robotic systems. This talk will provide a brief overview of some of these methods and will show how these techniques are used in development of a novel rehabilitation exoskeleton, named CLEVERarm, which is designed in the Laboratory for Control, Robotics and Automation at Texas A&M University.

Date:November 15, 2017
Time:7:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Angelique Morvant, Undergraduate Student, Texas A&M University, Department of Mathematics
Title:Neural Ideals and Receptive Fields
Abstract:Place cells are neurons in the brain that fire when an animal is in a given location, allowing the animal to navigate its environment. The area in which a particular cell fires is called its receptive field, and current research focuses on determining how the firing of place cells encodes spatial information about receptive fields. One way to represent the firing patterns of neurons is by a mathematical object called a neural ideal; the presence of certain polynomials in this ideal gives information about the relationships among the receptive fields. However, it may also be useful to know when the converse is true; that is, when do receptive field relationships tell us which polynomials are in the corresponding neural ideal? The answer to that question is the subject of this talk.

Date:November 29, 2017
Time:6:00pm
Location:BLOC 220
Speaker:Dr. Raymundo Arroyave, Texas A&M University, Department of Materials Science and En
Title:New Frontiers in Matherials Discovery
Abstract:While it may seem like the title of this talk has a typo, I really meant it! Many of society’s most pressing challenges require the development of new technologies, which in turn often require the development of new materials. Materials discovery, however, is extremely time-consuming. Because of this, the field of materials science is rapidly trying to adapt new methods and frameworks to accelerate the discovery of materials. In this talk, I will provide some examples from my own research program where we have used advanced mathematical and computational techniques to discover new materials or improve existing ones. The examples I will talk about use ideas from mathematical optimization, search, informatics, artificial intelligence, operations research, optimal learning, and even game theory to discover new materials. I will show how using these techniques we have been able to discover and develop new materials at a rate that is significantly faster than using traditional methods.